Cross-Exam: Chapters 21, 22, 23

Silence can be used to build up  drama.

Take a sip of water or a short silence break to collect thoughts before begin cross

Silence can be used to highlight info that has been just elicited.

Silence may be used to highlight a chapter completed immediately before recess or at the end of an entire cross.

Juries have a difficult time listening to a highly emotional pitch.  Courtroom theatrics are overrated.  Juries like facts.

Quieter is louder in the courtroom.  A lowered voice can intstill far more drama w/far less risk than the same question asked in a very loud and demanding tone.

Emotion must be congruent with purpose.

Voice, body movement, body language, and timing must be appropriate for every examination performed.

To diminish the importance of a fact, place it at the end of a series of greater nonfacts, that is, facts that would be of even greater significance had testimony been offered to support them.

To build the significance of a fact testified to by the witness, begin very generally with what the witness saw, then slowly and thoroughly proceed with more specificity as to what the witness saw.

Samantha@ambroselawgroup.com

To see trial skills in action visit our website www.thetrialprofessor.com

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